Human Voices

If I can get you through this year all my years will have been worth it. Because if the only thing that makes me special is getting you to pick up the phone, turn on the light, open the door; well then that’s not such a bad place to make a home.

I watched a leaf fall off a tree today. First leaf of the season. It reminded me that skylines change. The way the trees look today is not the way that they will always look, nor is it the way that they should always look.

I watched a boy fall out of a tree today. First boy of the season. He reminded me that bodies change. The way our bones look today is not the way that they will always look, nor is it the way that they should always look.

My years were built of trees that did not grow and bones that did not break. But in the year built of you and I the trees have risen and fallen like heartbeats with branches that reach like arms to cling to steadfast earth. In the year built of you and I my bones fractured as your flesh was torn from you, and the breaks didn’t heal back the way the doctors wanted.

You were never a little girl and this year was not the story of you becoming a man. You are finally the boy in the tree but you will never be small. Sorry you never had years to learn how the seasons change or how the body mends. Sorry you lived it all in one hour.

It is so loud and your voice on the phone is so quiet. But you answered. It is so dark and your desk lamp is so dim. But it is on. It is so small and your door is so heavy. But you opened it.

And you grow. And you mend. Yes, I am home. And this is our year.

fishingboatproceeds:

pennyforurthoughts:

approachingsignificance:

Sesame Street reaches out to 2.7 million American children with an incarcerated parent.

Last week, Sesame Street added a new character, to whom more than 2.7 million American children can now relate. The show introduced Alex, a child whose father is in prison, in a video included in the online interactive, “Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration.”
The “Little Children, Big Challenges” feature aims to reach children facing complex challenges, including bullying, sibling rivalry and parental incarceration.

Recent reports indicate that more than half of inmates in the US have children under the age of 18. As a result, there are more than 2.7 million children with a parent that is incarcerated (that translates to 3.6% or 1 in 28 American children). Most of the parents (66%) are incarcerated for non-violent crimes.

The Sesame Street website provides tips for caregivers to help the growing number of children affected by incarceration and features videos of both real-world children and Sesame Street characters sharing their own experiences with the subject.

Check out their tool-kit here. Well done Sesame Street, well done. 

When the media does things right.

The U.S. has the world’s highest incarceration rate*, more than five times that of China.
Non-white offenders receive longer sentences, particularly young non-white males.
Crime rates have been falling for decades in the U.S. but incarceration rates continue to skyrocket. Is that because prisons are keeping “bad people” off the streets? Not if Canada (and Europe and Australia and etc.) is any indication.
I’m glad that Sesame Street is doing this. But as a nation, we need to start asking ourselves how we ended up living in a country that imprisons six times more of its people per capita than any other country in North America or western Europe.

* Except arguably North Korea.

fishingboatproceeds:

pennyforurthoughts:

approachingsignificance:

Sesame Street reaches out to 2.7 million American children with an incarcerated parent.

Last week, Sesame Street added a new character, to whom more than 2.7 million American children can now relate. The show introduced Alex, a child whose father is in prison, in a video included in the online interactive, “Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration.”

The “Little Children, Big Challenges” feature aims to reach children facing complex challenges, including bullying, sibling rivalry and parental incarceration.

Recent reports indicate that more than half of inmates in the US have children under the age of 18. As a result, there are more than 2.7 million children with a parent that is incarcerated (that translates to 3.6% or 1 in 28 American children). Most of the parents (66%) are incarcerated for non-violent crimes.

The Sesame Street website provides tips for caregivers to help the growing number of children affected by incarceration and features videos of both real-world children and Sesame Street characters sharing their own experiences with the subject.

Check out their tool-kit here. Well done Sesame Street, well done. 

When the media does things right.

The U.S. has the world’s highest incarceration rate*, more than five times that of China.

Non-white offenders receive longer sentences, particularly young non-white males.

Crime rates have been falling for decades in the U.S. but incarceration rates continue to skyrocket. Is that because prisons are keeping “bad people” off the streets? Not if Canada (and Europe and Australia and etc.) is any indication.

I’m glad that Sesame Street is doing this. But as a nation, we need to start asking ourselves how we ended up living in a country that imprisons six times more of its people per capita than any other country in North America or western Europe.

* Except arguably North Korea.

browncoatfromtheshire:

unprofessionally:

I fucking hate dragging through a bajillion tags so I made #wrap, an extension to let tags wrap around to new lines!

HURRAH!

Til cross hatching is amazing for photoshop work. Well done Sharkeye!

Til cross hatching is amazing for photoshop work. Well done Sharkeye!

bryarly:

If our collected effort can get someone a fluffy chicken, we’ve got to be able to manage this. 

I entered this awesome contest to travel the world and win $50,000. I want to got to places like China, Brazil, Australia and Russia, and I want to meet my subscribers everywhere I go and hang out with them. I’ll be all, “Hey, you want to show me around?” and they’ll be all “Hell yes,” and then we’ll party harder than anyone ever. 

Thing is, I’m not in the Top 5 anymore and can’t be a finalist unless I get back up in there. I’m about 5,000 votes off. Help a girl out and vote!

You’re all fabulous and I love you. 

You can vote once per social media account by using the buttons on the right side of the page. That’s 5 votes a person! We can totally rock this! There are bunches of us on here! If you’ve already voted, ask your friends or mom or dog or dinosaur or teacher and I will personally send you a thank you with a giant smiley face. No lie. 

mama-bird:

coffeeandklonopin:

coffeeandklonopin:

carpe diem - seize the day

carpe noctem - seize the night

carpe natem - seize the ass

Seriously, if you guys don’t stop reblogging this I am going to carpe someone’s neck and break it.

carpe collum - seize the neck

visual-poetry:

»no thanks« by e.e. cummings (+)
shape poem in the form of a funeral urn dedicated to 14 publishers who rejected his book.
[read more]

visual-poetry:

»no thanks« by e.e. cummings (+)

shape poem in the form of a funeral urn dedicated to 14 publishers who rejected his book.

[read more]

thebrainscoop:

edwardspoonhands:

A lot of amazingly interesting things have been said in the less-than-24-hours since I uploaded my most recent video. I’ve heard a lot of excitement and seen a lot of problems outlined and solutions suggested. 
I’m excited to go into more detail about all of that soon, but first, one of the most common things I heard was “SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!” particularly  with regards to The Brain Scoop. So I just made a very simple site to allow you to support The Brain Scoop if you want to. You can sign up for a one-time gift, or a recurring donation, and all of the money will go to support the show and its creators. 
I decided to use WePay for this because i want to try out WePay’s system vs. PayPal’s, because PayPal has caused problems for a lot of people. You’ll need a credit card to give (sorry.)
Obviously this is not a permanent page, so if you’re seeing this at some point in the future and this page doesn’t exist anymore, that’s why. 

I want to keep scooping brains - it’s worthwhile and educational whether or not YouTube agrees.  I know you’ve all given so much already in terms of your commitment and time, so thank you for helping us out! 

thebrainscoop:

edwardspoonhands:

A lot of amazingly interesting things have been said in the less-than-24-hours since I uploaded my most recent video. I’ve heard a lot of excitement and seen a lot of problems outlined and solutions suggested. 

I’m excited to go into more detail about all of that soon, but first, one of the most common things I heard was “SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!” particularly  with regards to The Brain Scoop. So I just made a very simple site to allow you to support The Brain Scoop if you want to. You can sign up for a one-time gift, or a recurring donation, and all of the money will go to support the show and its creators. 

I decided to use WePay for this because i want to try out WePay’s system vs. PayPal’s, because PayPal has caused problems for a lot of people. You’ll need a credit card to give (sorry.)

Obviously this is not a permanent page, so if you’re seeing this at some point in the future and this page doesn’t exist anymore, that’s why. 

I want to keep scooping brains - it’s worthwhile and educational whether or not YouTube agrees.  I know you’ve all given so much already in terms of your commitment and time, so thank you for helping us out! 

danrezler:

Beethoven.

- Dan Rezler